Five Ways To Protect Remote Workers From Cyberattacks

KPM Fraud Update link to blog.

27 Apr Five Ways To Protect Remote Workers From Cyberattacks

Many businesses were unprepared when the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic required them to close their physical offices and shift to remote operations. Your company, for example, may have had to scramble to set up a virtual private network or move files to the cloud. And while adapting to working from home, employees may have let your usual security procedures slide.

From a cybercrime perspective, working from home generally is not as safe as working in the office. So, you need to look for ways to protect your disbursed workforce and prevent criminals from gaining access to your digital assets.

Here are five items to consider:

  • Invest in education. Require remote employees to participate in security-related training that covers ‘old-school’ phishing scams as well as new COVID-19 variations. As schemes emerge (check the Federal Trade Commission’s website for the latest), notify employees and remind them what to do if they think they have fallen victim to a scam.
  • Enable automatic updates. To keep the operating systems of employee computers safely patched, remind workers to enable automatic software updates. Also, double-check that every employee-assigned device is fortified with current malware and antivirus software.
  • Revisit access privileges. To maintain productivity, most employees need access to the same systems at home as they had in the office. However, consider reviewing which workers have access to certain files, network controls, and cloud accounts — and whether they really need access now. Remember that when employees work from home, their partners, children, and visitors may have easy access to their computers. To protect your company, ensure systems generate user audit trails that can be followed in the event of a breach.
  • Protect WiFi connections. While working from home, employees use their personal WiFi connections to access your company’s information technology environment. Unfortunately, many people use the default WiFi password or a simple password that hackers can easily break. To foil fraud perpetrators, employees should change it to a complex combination of letters and other characters. If possible, require them to use a VPN with two-factor authentication.
  • Secure your videoconferences. Most videoconferencing services employ multiple layers of security. But some platforms offer greater protection than others. Before choosing one, perform a simple Google search to read user reviews and security bug reports. Once you have selected a service, communicate security protocols before allowing employees to use it for company business.

Finally, provide employees with access to a technical support desk so they can report problems — and get solutions — as quickly as possible. Working from home may be new for a lot of Americans, but fraud is a familiar foe for most. If can be defeated with appropriate knowledge and tools.