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Beyond Assets: Safeguarding Your Health Care Wishes In Estate Planning

Typically, estate planning is thought of as securing your family’s financial future even after you pass away. To accomplish this objective, it’s essential to explore options like setting up an irrevocable trust to safeguard assets from creditors and creating a detailed will to explicitly designate beneficiaries and their entitlements.

But estate planning isn’t just about what happens to your assets after you die. It’s also about protecting yourself and your loved ones during your life. In this regard, it’s important to have a plan in place for making critical medical decisions in the event you’re unable to make them yourself. And, as with other aspects of your estate plan, the time to act is now, while you’re healthy. If an illness or injury renders you unconscious or otherwise incapacitated, it’ll be too late.

Estate Planning Considerations Regarding Your Health Care Wishes

Two Documents, Two Purposes
To ensure that your health care wishes are carried out, and that your family is spared the burden of guessing — or arguing over — what you would decide, put those wishes in writing. Generally, that means executing two documents: a living will and a health care power of attorney (HCPA).

Unfortunately, these documents are known by many different names, which can lead to confusion. Living wills are sometimes called “advance directives,” “health care directives,” or “directives to physicians.” And HCPAs also may be known as “durable medical powers of attorney,” “durable powers of attorney for health care,” or “health care proxies.” In some states, “advance directive” refers to a single document that contains both a living will and an HCPA.

For the sake of convenience, we’ll use the terms “living will” and “HCPA.” Regardless of terminology, these documents serve two important purposes: 1) to guide health care providers in the event you become terminally ill or permanently unconscious, and 2) to appoint someone you trust to make medical decisions on your behalf.

Living Will
A living will expresses your preferences for the use of life-sustaining medical procedures, such as artificial feeding and breathing, surgery, invasive diagnostic tests, and pain medication. It also specifies the situations in which these procedures should be used or withheld.

Living wills often contain a do not resuscitate order, which instructs medical personnel to not perform CPR in the event of cardiac arrest.

HCPA
An HCPA authorizes a surrogate — your spouse, child, or another trusted representative — to make medical decisions or consent to medical treatment on your behalf when you’re unable to do so. It’s broader than a living will, which generally is limited to end-of-life situations, although there may be some overlap.

An HCPA might authorize your surrogate to make medical decisions that don’t conflict with your living will, including consenting to medical treatment, placing you in a nursing home or other facility, or even implementing or discontinuing life-prolonging measures.

Put Your Plan Into Action
No matter how carefully you plan, living wills and HCPAs are effective only if your documents are readily accessible and health care providers honor them. Store your documents in a safe place that’s always accessible and be sure your loved ones know where they are. Also, keep in mind that health care providers may be reluctant to honor documents that are several years old, so it’s a good idea to sign new ones periodically. Contact us with questions regarding your estate planning.

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