What To Do If Your Non-Profit Receives An IRS Audit Letter

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26 Jun What To Do If Your Non-Profit Receives An IRS Audit Letter

The IRS’ staffing shortages have been well publicized and audits of individuals have decreased in the past several years. But it is a mistake to assume that the agency has stopped scrutinizing non-profits and conducting audits when it deems necessary. If your organization receives an audit letter, you need to know what the process involves and how you can help resolve it as quickly as possible.

Igniting a spark

An audit begins with the initial contact via letter from the IRS and continues until a closing letter is issued. Before closing an audit, an officer of your non-profit, your CPA, and the IRS agent will discuss the agent’s conclusions at a closing conference. Both the conference and letter will explain your appeal rights.

Audits can cover many areas. For example, the IRS may want to learn whether your organization has filed all returns and forms as required by law. Or it might delve into whether your activities have been consistent with your tax-exempt purpose, or whether unrelated business income tax or employment taxes were properly paid.

The igniting spark for an audit might be an IRS examination initiative or project, or complaints to the agency about potential noncompliance. In general, IRS Form 990 plays a strong role in the selection process. For instance, the IRS may apply risk models to your organization’s IRS Form 990 data related to governance or the incidence of fraud.

Types of audits

If your initial contact letter schedules an agent to visit, the IRS is conducting a field audit, which falls into one of two categories: 1) general program exam, which typically is conducted by a single IRS agent; or 2) Team Examination Program audit, which focuses on large, complex organizations and may involve a team of examiners.

If, on the other hand, your initial IRS letter asks you to deliver documents to an IRS office by mail, the agency is conducting a correspondence audit. An agent generally will perform the audit via letters and phone calls to your officers or representative. If a correspondence audit grows more complex or your non-profit does not respond to requests, it can turn into a field audit.

The IRS also might contact you to announce a compliance check. This is not an audit; it is a determination of whether your organization is adhering to record-keeping and information reporting requirements. However, a compliance check can lead to an audit.

Handle it right

Whether you are facing a field or correspondence audit, do not try to handle the matter without the expertise of a CPA. Contact us for help.